Why You Need a Topographical Survey for Your New Development

Large projects, such as new housing developments, can often be costly affairs; therefore, it is imperative that the planning stages are meticulous and well thought out. A topographical survey is the very first part of the development process, and is the foundation in which your new project will stand.

 

Transforming sketches

Knowing what is on the land is vital, especially if you want your development to proceed without incident. A thorough topographical survey is like a window into the future, providing a vision on how your empty site will transform into a stunning new development.

Everything needs to be planned out, such as where drainage pipes will be placed and where to build foundations for a flat surface. Topographical surveys give developers the data they need in order to make the right decision the first time.

Saving time and money

The right information from a survey will allow planners and architects to foresee any problems that may lie ahead due to the way the land sits. The knowledge before the project can save time and money, as they can work their plans around the findings in the survey, rather than encountering issues half way through a build.

Everything from road markings through to maximum building heights and alignment can be included in a survey for a developer to work with, making a topographical survey an indispensable part of any successful project.

How a topographical survey works

Topographical surveys are conducted in one of two ways; either conventionally or aerially.

Conventional surveys are the most popular; they are carried out by land surveyors who look at the surface of the land and are generally still conducted in a manual fashion, despite the advances in topographical surveying technology.

Aerial surveys however are done by taking photographs of the land from the air. Two overlapping photos are looked at together to form a stereo pair that allow surveyors to see the ground’s surface from two different vantage points. This gives the surveyor a greater sense of depth than is possible with a single photo.